Units and Measurements

Weights and measures [G]

Weights and measures [G]

Gal: unit adopted to express the intensity determinations of gravity: it consists of the dyne, which was given this new name, in memory of Galileo Galilei, when applied to that purpose. Its divisor is the milligal = 0.001 gal.

Gallon (gallon): Anglo-American measure of capacity for liquids.

1 English (imperial) gallon = 4,546 liters = 8 pints.

1 English (imperial) gallon = 1.2 US gallons

1 US gallon = 0.83 English (imperial) gallon.

1 US gallon; 3,785 liters = 6,661 pints.

This unit also records other variations in its equivalences, depending on its use, whether for beer, aggregates, etc.

Ganta: Philippine measure of capacity for aggregates and liquids.

For aggregates = 32 apatanes = 3 liters.

For liquids = 8 sucks = 3 liters.

Carafe (damajuana): Measure of capacity for liquids. In Argentina, the most common are equivalent to 5 and 10 liters.

Garrafon (large demijohn): Capacity measure. In Cuba, two varieties are registered = 16 e = 18,125 liters.

Gauss (gauss): Unit of identity of magnetic flux of the CGS system, consisting of the intensity of the field that acts with a force of one dyne, on a pole whose magnetic intensity is one CGS unit. Pole intention = 0.0001 weber per square meter. Miriagaus is the one used in practice.

Gavilla: Cuban measure for tobacco = to the leaves that enter the ring formed by the index finger and thumb. There are bundles of 25, 30, 35, 40 and even more leaves, depending on the quality of the tobacco.

Geme: Spanish linear measure = 0.139 m = ½ foot.

Gilbert: Unit of magnetomotive force in the CGS system, which corresponds to the essential to make a flux of a weber pass in a reluctance of a cersted.

The gilbert is = 1.256637061435916 ampere turn.

As a practical unit decigilbert is used.

Baume degree: unit for the expression of densities, which results from dividing into 15 equal parts, the stem segment of an hydrometer between the leveling point with distilled water at 10 °C, which is marked with the zero of the scale and the level point, lower than the previous one, with a solution of 15 parts of sodium chloride in 85 parts of distilled water, at the same temperature, which is marked with the number 15. This arbitrary scale extends in both directions of the stem.

Degree Celsius: unit of temperature that results from dividing into 100 equal parts the space of the thermometric column between the melting point of ice, which was called 0 °, and the boiling point of water, marked with 100 °, both operations at a pressure of 760 mm.

The equivalences are 1 degree centigrade = 0.8 reaumur = 1.8 Fahrenheit.

Degree Celsius: unit of temperature that results from dividing into 100 equal parts the space of the thermometric column between the melting point of ice, which was called 0 °, and the boiling point of water, marked with 100 °, both operations at a pressure of 760 mm. It was invented in 1742 by the Swedish physicist Anders Celsius, its divisions are called degrees Celsius.

Densimetric degrees: this name is given to various units that serve to express density or relationship between the mass of a body and that of a volume identical to water.

Degree Fahrenheit: Anglo-American thermometric unit, which results from dividing into 180 equal parts the interval of the thermometric column between the temperature of melting ice, whose point is marked with 32 °F, and the boiling point of water, which corresponds to 212 °F.

Geographic degree: it is designated as 1/360 of the mean longitude of the terrestrial meridian = 111,307 km.

Hygrometric degree: in meteorology, the relative humidity of the atmosphere or the relationship between the amount of water vapor contained in the air and that which it would contain if it were saturated at the same temperature. Absolute humidity and saturation deficit are expressed in grams per m³, while specific humidity is valued in grams per kilogram of moist air.

Kelvin degree: Its degrees are identical to Celsius in extension, but whose zero is absolute zero or minimum possible temperature, which coincides with -273.16 °C. They are also called absolute degrees.

Linear Degree: Old Roman Empire measure of length = 2.5 feet = 0.740795 m.

Large Gross: Quantity measure = 12 gross = 1,728 units.

Grain: Old measure of weight = 1/24 part of the scruple. Other variations = ¼ carat = 0.05 g (in trade) and was also used for materials and precious stones = 0.049923 g and 0.051375 g respectively.

Thick: quantity measurement = 12 dozen = 144 units.

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